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Conservancy Blog

Conservancy Blog

Invasive Species Spotlight: Common Reed (Phragmites australis)

Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Many invasive species become such a large and familiar part of our landscape that we stop noticing them. Common Reed or Phragmites australis may be one of these plants. It lines highways, fills drainage basins, dominates floodplains and in some places covers thousands of acres. It is so common that even though it often grows to well over 10 feet, we barely notice it. In the northeastern United States and Canada this one plant has cost millions to state and local economies.

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Delay the Haying to Help Bobolinks Thrive

Thursday, May 30, 2019

How would you feel about a visitor who arrives without warning, then decides to camp behind your house for a few weeks, singing loudly and raising a family? And oh yes, he’s brought a dozen friends?You might feel differently if your visitors are Bobolinks. These brilliantly colored...

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Bird Migration: New technology sheds light on age-old behavior

Thursday, February 21, 2019

In spring, keep your eyes and ears open to experience one of nature’s most amazing phenomena: bird migration. Using both modern technologies and old-fashioned observation, scientists are learning more about where birds go and what they need to survive the journey.

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Invasive Species Spotlight: Lesser celandine (Ficaria verna)

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

The blooming of ephemeral flowers is one of the early signs that spring has finally sprung, and warmer weather is—hopefully—here to stay. However, not all spring ephemerals are a welcome start to the season. Don’t let the sweet buttercup appearance of lesser celandine fool you. This early, sprouting invasive species grows vigorously, quickly forming large mats and outcompeting native ephemerals before they even have a chance. Lesser celandine can wreak much havoc in its short lifecycle which makes early detection and control key to protecting our native nectar sources of spring.

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