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Conservancy Blog

Conservancy Blog

Invasive Species Spotlight: Lesser celandine (Ficaria verna)

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

The blooming of ephemeral flowers is one of the early signs that spring has finally sprung, and warmer weather is—hopefully—here to stay. However, not all spring ephemerals are a welcome start to the season. Don’t let the sweet buttercup appearance of lesser celandine fool you. This early, sprouting invasive species grows vigorously, quickly forming large mats and outcompeting native ephemerals before they even have a chance. Lesser celandine can wreak much havoc in its short lifecycle which makes early detection and control key to protecting our native nectar sources of spring.

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Glenolden Christmas Bird Count at the Waterloo Mills Preserve

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

The 99th Glenolden Christmas Bird Count in Delaware County, part of the 119th Audubon Christmas Bird Count, will be held Saturday, December 15, 2018. This year marks the tenth time Brandywine Conservancy staff has participated in the count on the Waterloo Mills Preserve.

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Invasive Species Spotlight: Southern Pine Beetle—an emerging threat to pines?

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

The southern pine beetle’s (SPB) diminutive size belies the lethal impact embodied in its scientific name: Dendroctonus (“Tree-killer”) frontalis. It is “the most destructive pest of pine in the southern United States.” While not what we usually classify as an “invasive” species (exotic plants or animals imported far from their native range), the southern pine beetle’s increasing threat to our pine woods makes it worth our attention.

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3 Tricks for Turning your Halloween Pumpkin “Green”

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Crisp mornings, pumpkin spice offerings and changing leaves let us know that Fall is upon us and with it, Halloween.  According to the Halloween Industry Association, 49.2% of Americans decorate for Halloween and nearly as many carve pumpkins.  Over 1 billion pounds of pumpkins are...

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