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Conservancy Blog

Conservancy Blog

Prescribed Fire: Beauty in Action

Thursday, April 9, 2020

A prescribed fire is a beautiful thing. When Jim Moore, an owner of one of Brandywine’s conservation easement properties, shared some drone footage of a prescribed burn—a fire that was deliberately set and professionally controlled—we were struck by the beauty of the aerial imagery....

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Early spring flowers

Monday, March 30, 2020

In the best of times, and in the least best of times, nature’s seasonal rhythms provide a comforting sense of order. Spring wildflowers remind us that beauty is precious and worth taking note of. Enjoying flowers is an antidote to anxiety, focusing your attention on nature.While social...

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Native orchids

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Orchids are beautiful, striking, colorful and fragrant. They’re found in flower arrangements, at florist shops and in Longwood Gardens’ annual Orchid Extravaganza! But did you know that orchids can also be found in our region’s natural areas?

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Invasive Species Spotlight: Foraging for Invasives

Sunday, March 1, 2020

With the start of spring comes the beginning of another season of the never-ending battle between conservation warriors and the pesky invasive plant species that have taken over our ground. The U.S. Forest Service defines “invasive species” as those that are non-native to the ecosystem...

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Invasive Species Spotlight: Lesser celandine (Ficaria verna)

Thursday, February 20, 2020

The blooming of ephemeral flowers is one of the early signs that spring has finally sprung, and warmer weather is—hopefully—here to stay. However, not all spring ephemerals are a welcome start to the season. Don’t let the sweet buttercup appearance of lesser celandine fool you. This early, sprouting invasive species grows vigorously, quickly forming large mats and outcompeting native ephemerals before they even have a chance. Lesser celandine can wreak much havoc in its short lifecycle which makes early detection and control key to protecting our native nectar sources of spring.

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