Conservancy Blog

Conservancy Blog

Wind pollination: Social distancing in the plant world

Pollinators and their partners come in all colors, shapes and sizes. Innumerable assortments of butterflies, bees, moths, flies, beetles, birds and bats are drawn to visit myriad varieties of fragrant, colorful flowers where they sip nectar and collect pollen. Pollination both feeds the pollinators and enables plants to reproduce. But there is one very important pollinator that is colorless, has no sense of smell and doesn’t drink sweet nectar: Wind.
Continue Reading

DIY Bird Shop: Nesting Materials

Spring is here! Although birds continue to migrate north, many call Pennsylvania home and are looking for nesting places to raise their young. The nesting material birds use varies among species and habitats, but can include mosses, grasses, twigs, pine needles, leaves, animal fur, feathers, mud, spider webs and more! Help birds find what they need by creating your own one-stop shop of nesting materials to hang in your backyard.
Continue Reading

DIY Birdseed Eggs

If you have some leftover plastic Easter eggs that you are looking to repurpose, try out this fun DIY activity that your backyard birds will appreciate and find very appetizing!
Continue Reading

Desktop Easement Monitoring from Home

We are living in an unusual time. With many of us now working from home, we’ve become experts at programs like Zoom, WebEx, Microsoft Teams and a multitude of other technologies that help ease the transition and keep us connected to family, friends, colleagues and collaborators. For those of us who are lucky enough to have jobs we can perform remotely, we find that the disruption is not actually all that disruptive to our work. However, it does make us think a little harder about what we can and cannot do from the comfort of our own homes.
Continue Reading

Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day

Today, April 22, 2020, marks the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day. Through the years, this day has taken on the context of the time in which it’s celebrated. I looked up a newscast by Walter Cronkite on the first Earth Day in 1970—which I remember well—and was simultaneously thankful for how far we’ve come in our awareness of our natural environment and saddened by the fact that we are still not fully addressing deep concerns of the past and those that have come to light in the years since.
Continue Reading